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Eco Printing Reflections - September 2022


It has been such a pleasure learning about eco-printing through embodied research. Over the last 6 months, I have learned how to eco-print on paper and fabric in a variety of ways. In each method, the fabric was rolled onto thick sticks found in Lions Park and cut about 1' long, so it would fit in my cauldron.


Eco-Printing session one:


During this session, we used leaves from English Ivy, English Holly, Bindweed, and Mountian Ash that were soaked in iron water for 30 minutes. We used dry wool fabric that was mordanted in soy milk. The fabric was then heat treated using a steaming method for 90 minutes.




Eco-Printing session two:


During this session, we used leaves from Mountain Ash, and English Ivy that were soaked in iron water for 30 minutes. We used dry cotton fabric that was mordanted in soy milk. The fabric was then heat treated using a submersion method for 90 minutes.





Eco-Printing session three:


During this session, we used leaves from Mountain Ash that were dry. We used dry cotton fabric that was mordanted in soy milk, and I applied paper towel soaked in iron water to the fabric. The fabric was then heat treated using a submersion method for 90 minutes.





Eco-Printing session four:


During this session, we explored eco-printing on paper. We used English Ivy, Mountain Ash, Bindweed and St. Johns Wort that were soaked in iron water for 30 minutes. Check out my blog post on eco-printing on paper to learn this method!





Eco-Printing session five:


During this session, we used leaves from English Ivy and Bindweed that were dry. We used dry cotton fabric that was mordanted in soy milk, and we applied paper towel soaked in iron water to the fabric. The fabric was then heat treated using a submersion method for 90 minutes.




Eco-Printing session six:


During this session, we explored eco-printing on paper using English Ivy. It's interesting, I thought that Ivy would leave a stronger mark. It's all part of the learning process!





This was such a fun process and definitely warrants further practice and research in the future. Living in an apartment makes this kind of art making tricky, and I am very grateful I have had the opportunity to utilize Lions Park to give this process a try!



Kaitlyn Beugh's mission is to assist you in fostering a soulful connection to self and the natural world through creation and intention. She is an interdisciplinary visual artist. Her art practice plays on the ephemeral, and is intuitively channeled and created in a flow state.

She lives, works, and plays on the unceded land of the Coast Salish First Nations. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Visual Arts with a minor in Social Practice and Community Engagement from Emily Carr University of Art and Design, and has a background in social services.

Kaitlyn is a practicing artist and has some of her artwork for sale in the form of original pieces via her website here. Kaitlyn is currently studying herbalism and connecting deeper with the energies of plants and natures cycles.


Let's stay connected. Sign up for my email list here: https://www.kaitlynbeugh.com/




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